Road Trip Continued: Down the Island to Victoria

It was a clear, crisp day when Ellen and me walked Rathtrevor Beach near Parksville two weeks ago. The tide was so low that the beach seemed to disappear into the far distance. The low angle of the sun accentuated the sand’s ripple like textures left behind by the receding tide. We weren’t the only ones on the beach but the wide open space gave us the feeling that we had the whole beach to ourselves.

In early August when I last visited French Creek, the wharf was alive with activity. Fishing boats were coming and going, the fish cleaning table was busy and the shreaking of sea gulls was incessant. On this visit it was quiet. Prawn and tuna sales on a lone fishing boat and maintenance activities on others kept a few people busy. That’s all! Sadly, some of the larger boats displayed ‘for sale’ signs, an indication perhaps of the fishing industry’s poor health.

After spending a few days in the Qualicum Beach and Parksville area we headed down Vancouver Island to Victoria. We were both looking forward to visiting my sister and her husband and our wonderful friends.

This trip to Victoria would be our first without having Ellen’s dad to visit. For over 5 years we had made regular trips to be with him in his declining years. It is so different now without him but there are many memories to cherish.

I love to take long walks in Victoria. My camera is always with me. Usually, I start or end at one of my favourite coffee shops, the Oak Bay Marina Café or the Breakwater Bistro and Café. Often I spend time in these coffees shops working on my iPad drafting future blog articles.

The Oak Bay Marina Café overlooks a colourful collection of pleasure crafts and commercial fishing boats. With a backdrop of Mount Baker in Washington State it is a beautiful place to make images. The Breakwater Bistro and Café overlooks the cruise ship terminal at Odgen Point. Its an active and colourful place especially during cruise boat season.

The collection of images above was made on two separate camera walks. One started at Ogden Point and the other in Oak Bay. On both occasions my camera was equiped with a 35mm prime lens.

Near my sister’s home is the Gowlland Tod Provincial Park. A mid morning hike through the park brought us to Todd Inlet, a branch of Saanich Inlet. There we found the remains of a cement plant and wharf that was closed in 1919. In the day, cement was manufactured and shipped from this location. The quary from which the rock was taken to make the cement was reclaimed and developed into the now world famous Butchart Gardens which opened in 1929.

Not much is left of the cement plant facility. Concrete pilings are still in place, a stack of concrete pilings that were never installed and building foundations show the signs of decay, rot and the touch of graffiti artists. Bird houses have been nailed to some of the old wharf’s wooden pilings. Even a crumbling chimney still reaches above the trees.

 

This entry was posted in My Work, Travel.

One Comment

  1. corolp October 14, 2019 at 8:19 am #

    Beautiful images of our island’s offerings. RP’s grandfather worked at the cement plant when he first arrived in Victoria,1906. There is an interesting history.

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